• Measles is a highly contagious viral infection that spreads through respiratory droplets from coughing, sneezing, or talking
  • In spite of a safe, effective vaccination, measles is on the rise in Arizona.
  • Before widespread vaccination became the norm in the 1960s, most people 

Measles is a highly contagious virus and it's spreading across arizona
Arizona is seeing a rise in a variety of respiratory viruses this year. // Canva
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Respiratory Illness Season in Arizona

Arizona is at the peak of the respiratory illness season. Cold and flu season is in full swing, plus respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and the latest resurgence of Covid are causing widespread illness throughout the state.

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According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS), one more infectious disease is making the rounds this year.

The Resurgence of a Childhood Disease in Arizona

Most children in Arizona are vaccinated for a broad spectrum of illnesses, most before their first birthday.

Measles is a highly contagious virus and it's spreading across arizona
Cases of measles began to drop, with widespread vaccinations becoming standard in the 1960s. // Canva
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According to the Children's Hospital of Philidelphia, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination has been widely distributed in America since the 1960s. Since that time, measles infections dropped dramatically.

Reaching Herd Immunity with Measles Vaccinations in Arizona

To achieve herd immunity against measles, Arizona needs at least 95% of its population to be vaccinated. Measles is a highly contagious disease that can cause serious complications and even death.

Measles is a highly contagious virus and it's spreading across arizona
Nearly 450 people died every year due to measles before vaccination was in widespread use. // Canva
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According to ADHS, before the measles vaccine was widely available, most children got measles by the time they were 15 years old.

Every year:

  • Nearly 450 people died because of measles
  • 48,000 were hospitalized
  • 7,000 had seizures
  • About 1,000 suffered permanent brain damage or deafness

Widespread vaccination changed all that. However, since the pandemic, the CDC and other organizations have seen vaccination rates fall and a sharp rise in measles infections.

Measles is a highly contagious virus and it's spreading across arizona
If you're not sure about your vaccination status, talk to your doctor or health care professional. // Canva
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Measles on the Rise in Arizona

Measles outbreaks continue to occur across Arizona and around the United States. According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, Arizona had 58 confirmed and probable measles cases last year.

Measles is a highly contagious virus and it's spreading across arizona
Measles is highly contagious, and infections can be deadly. // Canva
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Measles is a highly contagious viral infection that spreads through respiratory droplets from coughing, sneezing, or talking. People who are not vaccinated against measles have the highest risk of infection.

According to the Mayo Clinic, "Measles can cause serious complications, such as pneumonia, brain inflammation, and death."

Most adults who grew up in the United States have been immunized against the virus, but if there's any question, it helps to talk with a doctor to determine whether you need a booster shot or a complete series of immunizations against the virus.

Measles is a highly contagious virus and it's spreading across arizona
The best prevention against measles begins with childhood vaccinations. // Canva
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The Arizona Department of Health Services urges residents to check their vaccination status and get vaccinated if they are not protected. Vaccination is the best way to prevent measles and protect yourself and your community from this preventable disease.

Beware! The #1 Cause of Death in Arizona Revealed

Here are the top 10 leading causes of death in Arizona, according to the CDC.

Gallery Credit: Val Davidson

Answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

Vaccinations for COVID-19 began being administered in the U.S. on Dec. 14, 2020. The quick rollout came a little more than a year after the virus was first identified in November 2019. The impressive speed with which vaccines were developed has also left a lot of people with a lot of questions. The questions range from the practical—how will I get vaccinated?—to the scientific—how do these vaccines even work?

Keep reading to discover answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions.

Gallery Credit: Stephanie Parker

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